Progress Has Been Made

Finally. Finally, a honest-to-goodness non-ideological post about my writing progress. It was, after all, why I originally started this blog, although it later morphed into other things and almost took on some web programming stuff when I started doing that last year.

So far, I’ve been working on both a short story and a novel, that are completely unrelated. The short story I actually finished a couple of months ago, but I haven’t gotten around to editing it yet before I try to send it somewhere. Meanwhile, I’ve been getting in time working on my novel, and using the awesome program that is Scrivener. One thing I have noticed, however, is that I’ve been using more of it’s basic word processor functions, and haven’t been taking advantage of its project management/plotting functions. I’ve been mostly filling in things I’ve already plotted out, but as I do so, I find the original plot needs significant rework. Which is a good thing, I think, because trying to stay to the original plan is usually not a good thing. You have to adapt to new ideas and new data, and while sometimes that can be a big problem, particularly if you just randomly go off in different directions, often it really improves.

One thing I did was follow the idea behind the book Write Your Novel From The Middle: A New Approach for Plotters, Pantsers and Everyone in Between (although, I really haven’t read it yet, just the description, but it was enough.) Write the turning point in the middle of the novel where the hero comes to the critical realization, and then revolve the story around that. I went a step farther and also wrote the ending before I had written the rest, and focused on writing key pieces I will then later string together. It’s a very different and interesting feeling, because the text is now even more fluid and open to revision than it ever has been before. And I’ve never written the ending of a story before I had written the rest of it. I was always very chronological in my writing, seeing where things go as I trundle along. I actually do like some outlines and plotting, but a lot of plotting frustrates me. Stories aren’t history, they’re much more fluid than that. What James Scott Bell has in this book seems to be the ideal balance.

Scrivener has also been a godsend, though one thing that I am trying to figure out is just how to break between scenes. Should a scene end on this line, or the next? It matters because if I move scenes around, will lines be out of place? Well, I suppose it can’t be helped. It will be interesting to see how that will work, however. So far, I haven’t had a real need to actually move scenes around. I actively look forward to the day when I do.