Why Gundam Build Fighters Ending Is The Worst Thing Ever

I’ll just say it: I’m an anime fan. I’m probably not an otaku – I don’t worship it that obsessively – but I do love Japanese animation. One of the first cartoons I saw as a child was the original Digimon, and from there I went into the Japanese Transformers, Neon Genesis Evangelion, and all sorts of things. Recently, I’ve been watching the Gundam franchise, and finding out the latest series will have only one more episode has really made me have some profound thoughts.

Yes, Gundam Build Fighters, the dorkiest, lightest, and just utterly most un-Gundam of Gundam shows has made me have deep thoughts.

It’s okay if you think I’m crazy. I probably am.

Gundam Build Fighters is, from the surface, aimed at children. Even with the battles and the skullduggery that goes on in the background, it is a lighthearted romp through a massive fandom that has touched on Japanese and Western audiences alike for 35 years. (Build Fighters is actually part of the 35th anniversary celebration, which will continue with the next series, Reconguista in G, being created by Gundam’s original creator, Yoshiyuki “Kill Em All” Tomino. Yeah, that’s not a misspelling; Japanese audiences prefer the hard “g” sound than Reconquista. Figures.)

Set in near-future Japan, it takes the real life industry of Gunpla – plastic Gundam models – and using magic (basically) animates them inside of special playing boards, letting their weapons actually fire lasers and bullets and missiles, and they actually explode when destroyed. Nobody, though, is actually harmed, though they take it very seriously. The series itself engages in a ton of lampshading and parodying Japanese anime shows where the basis is on collecting and winning in tournaments, over just how silly it is to be so super serious about playing tournaments with toys. It does so not in a blatant way, either, although I’m not sure “subtle” would describe it either. It merely makes it all work in a spectacularly entertaining fashion.

Here’s the weird thing, for me: I am a 25-year old white male, one who has lost a good amount of weight in the past couple of months and doesn’t look like he lives in his mother’s basement, and here I am being very unhappy that this show is ending.

What kind of a person am I?

There’s a small bit of me that looks at the rest of me and wonders, “Jesus, man, are you ever going to grow up and get into the adult world?” I shouldn’t really care about this show. It is entirely fictional. It’s definitely a niche thing. And yet I am still rather pissed that, in all their wisdom, Sunrise is only giving it 25 episodes. That will make it the shortest Gundam TV show by far, with the next shortest, After War Gundam X, coming in at 39 episodes. (Note: I haven’t watched Gundam X, so I have no idea what it’s like. Other than it’s post-apocalyptic. Sorta.)

This show deserves, at the very least, a second season. There are so many questions left unresolved. For instance, one of the protagonists, Reiji, comes from another world (and so does the “big bad”.) We only see him disappear in a flash of light once, although his other world is talked about a bit as a subplot. But ending it now? We have no idea what is going on with that! It’s barely even touched upon, only enough to make us wonder “What?” And maybe that is the point, that not everything should be explained, that there should still be some mystery in life – for else, why live?

To be fair, though, I don’t think the creators of this show were going anywhere that philosophical.

But what really makes this show so wonderful is that it is a total release. Living in the Washington DC area, in a place where a hotdog costs one and a half reverse mortgages, bombarded every day with politics and scheming and BS, Gundam Build Fighters is my little escape valve. I can watch a brilliantly colorful world come to life and just forget about all the insanity going on in 3D land. I can cheer on the protagonists, Reiji and Sei, as they fight to win the championship. I can curse their opponents for underhanded moves. I can laugh at the zany jokes and awe at the cool moves.

At the end of the day, Gundam Build Fighters is pure catharthis. In many ways, it’s therapy.

The weird thing especially for me is how I have come to care about the characters in a real way. I’ve always known that an author’s first job is to make the reader care about a character. This is one of the ironclad rules of writing. But for me, I never had the reactions others had. For example, some people said they cried when reading the last Harry Potter book. I don’t think I could do that. Harry Potter is, after all, fictional. And yet here, I am practically crying over the end of this series. I don’t want it to end. It needs to go to at least 50 episodes. That makes me feel quite sad.

In many ways, it reminds me of the first anime I ever watched: Digimon Adventure. I saw that in second grade, and I remember being quite teary eyed as a child over the ending. I wanted it to go on forever. And now I want this to go on forever. I hate goodbyes. I hate endings. I just need that release to keep going. I need something to keep my sanity in a world gone completely insane.

That’s why I love Gundam Build Fighters, and ultimately all Japanese animation. It is a total cathartic release from the world in ways that I cannot obtain as readily from Western media. Don’t ask me why or how. I don’t understand it either. Maybe it’s because Hollywood has just completely run out of ideas. I don’t know.

But, for whatever reason, Gundam Build Fighters has helped me keep myself intact in this world by giving me a portal to another. That’s a very useful thing to have at any age.

And with that, my friends, it is now time for me to go watch the final episode. It’s going to be a good one.