Can we just stop making stuff up?

The title of a recent article at The New Republic reads:

The Period Is Pissed
When did our plainest punctuation mark become so aggressive?

The author then goes on to assume that adding a period at the end of your texts indicates you’re angry.

This is one of the plainest cases of someone just making shit up. Ok, so he cites a professor of linguistics and the editor of something called the Awl (presumably short for “The Awful,” judging by the editor’s comments.) But this guy is definitely smoking something.

Look, a period at the end of sentences is not indicating aggressiveness. It is proper grammar. Nothing more, nothing less. Yes, some people don’t do that and use line breaks because it’s more efficient to type that way on mobile phones. Not technically proper, but it’s a convenience to use such a wonderful device. I have no problem with that. But if you start assuming that using periods in a message indicates “anger,” well, then you’re going to have a lot of problems in your life. You’re probably going to end up hating a lot of people or feeling really bad about yourself. And then your life is going to get worse.

Do yourself a favor. Don’t assume. It makes an ass out of you and me.

EDIT: I am now very angry at my high school for making me think grammar is spelled with an “e”.

Not doing NaNoWriMo, but Scrivener is a yes

I’m not doing NaNoWriMo. Again.

Perhaps it’s because I don’t have time and I’m really getting in the way of myself. Perhaps it’s because I just want to move on my own schedule. Perhaps it’s because I always feel NaNoWriMo is extremely gimmicky and gimmicky doesn’t work for me. Perhaps it’s because, at the moment, I want to get out a short story, not a novel.

For whatever reason, I won’t do NaNoWriMo again for the umpteenth year in a row. That’s okay; I don’t have anything against people who do do it. It’s just not for me, and I suspect it’s not for a lot of people.

I have been writing, however, and more than just code. I have been trying out the program Scrivener, and while I’m a bit apprehensive of paying $40 for a piece of software that isn’t a resource-intensive first person shooter, I think I’m going to end up buying it. It’s actually a great word processor combined with a fantastic project management suite. I still want to try it, though, for the next 24 days I have it free. I think I can get at least 3,000 more words out of it on that.

Now, if only Aeon Timeline can be brought over to Windows, that would be excellent.

Comment Archive: Response to Matt Zwolinski on Rothbard

I hate doing posts like this, but the comment section on Bleeding Heart Libertarians is again acting up. So to preserve my comment in case of an error, here is my comment on Matt Zwolinski’s blog post on Murray Rothbard:

Hmm.

Inasmuch as Rothbard actually made people question the state itself, and thus give them the alternative framework to “the state must do everything,” I can give him credit. But I think in the end Rothbard’s anarcho-capitalism may have damaged the liberty movement more than it helped. One of the reasons people don’t take libertarianism seriously is because we have a ton of people running around saying we should just abolish government entirely. People don’t generally take those radical approaches that easily, not unless there is mass starvation and violence going on.

Also, the paleo strategy was really, really bad. That alone should make one question Rothbard’s judgement, if he was a “happy warrior,” and if someone would want to hang out with him. By all accounts he was kind of nutty, and if he’s writing newsletters blaming blacks for all of society’s ills, then he’s kind of not a charming and delightful person, but just a racist with a veneer of geniality.

I agree with Brennan. Rothbard is a hack, and his disciple Rockwell (and that other guy, Hoppe) has continued tainting libertarianism with some pretty despicable ideas. I’m not sure I would give him three cheers, let alone seven. Maybe one. And it would be lukewarm.

I will agree with you on that there shouldn’t be a war between BHL and LvMI types. Except for when the LvMI types express some abhorrent views on race and sexuality, but other than that, you are correct. There is a lot of common ground. (Although praxeology befuddles me a bit…)

This isn’t the first time BHL’s comment section has cocked up. For some reason their Disqus install periodically develops amnesia. I literally saw the comment number change before my eyes from 1 to 0 and back to 1 again.

Hopefully we’ll be back to me regularly posting short quips about how I’m going to be back to posting about non-political and non-theological topics but then post incessantly about politics and theology.

A fine comment on cronyism

By yours truly, of course:

Newsflash: government does not mitigate the excesses of “capitalism.” What it does it exacerbate the excesses of corporatism. By creating a system where profit depends on political connections and lobbying, by having a government big enough to intervene in the economy and choose winners and losers, you’re creating cronyism.

How do you have cronyism in a (classical) liberal economic system, aka capitalism? You can’t really, because the entire economic system is predicated on fulfilling customers’ needs and providing value to society, not by lobbying and buying elections.

Your legislators are bought and paid for, and not by you. Why progressives willingly continue to be Big Businesses’ useful idiots I will never understand. Quit playing into corporations’ hands by giving them the tools to ban their competition and pad their executive paychecks.

Sauce: http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/10/can-america-survive-parliamentary-norms-presidential-system#comment-1083914729

Textbook Example of “Thinking Too Much”

These sorts of things embarrass me. Can y’all stop overthinking this shit and just enjoy the movie, please?

http://mashable.com/2013/07/12/the-pixar-theory/

The Pixar Theory: Every Character Lives in the Same Universe

Jon Negroni spent one year untangling the secret world hidden deep within Pixar films. This thesis (printed in full below) originally appeared on his personal blog and quickly became a viral sensation. Negroni continues to update his post based on interesting feedback from readers.

Several months ago, I watched a fun-filled video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe.

Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call “The Pixar Theory,” a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme.

This theory covers every Pixar production since Toy StoryA Bug’s LifeToy Story 2Monsters Inc.Finding NemoThe IncrediblesCarsRatatouilleWall-EUpToy Story 3Cars 2Brave and Monsters University.

Every movie is connected and implies major events that influence every single movie. Here we go.